Characterization of a Degradable Polar Hydrophobic Ionic Polyurethane Using a Monocyte/Endothelial Cell Co-culture (in vitro) and a Subcutaneous Implant Mouse Model (in vivo)

Characterization of a Degradable Polar Hydrophobic Ionic Polyurethane Using a Monocyte/Endothelial Cell Co-culture (in vitro) and a Subcutaneous Implant Mouse Model (in vivo)

Show full item record

Title: Characterization of a Degradable Polar Hydrophobic Ionic Polyurethane Using a Monocyte/Endothelial Cell Co-culture (in vitro) and a Subcutaneous Implant Mouse Model (in vivo)
Author: McDonald, Sarah M.
Abstract: A degradable/polar/hydrophobic/ionic (D-PHI) polyurethane with properties intended to promote tissue regeneration in a small diameter peripheral artery vascular graft was evaluated for cell biocompatibility and growth. Films were cast in polypropylene 96 well plates for monocyte/endothelial cell (EC) co-culture in vitro studies and porous scaffold discs were implanted in an in vivo subcutaneous mouse model. After 7 days in culture the co-culture demonstrated cell adhesion and growth, low esterase activity (a measure of degradative potential and cell activation), no detectable release of pro-inflammatory cytokine (tumour necrosis factor -α) but measurable anti-inflammatory interleukin (IL)-10. The EC and the co-culture expressed the EC biomarker CD31, whereas the monocyte monoculture did not. Cytokine array analysis of the in vivo characterization of D-PH supported an anti-inflammatory phenotype of cells at the site of the implant. Levels of IL-6 significantly decreased over time while IL-10 was significantly higher at 6 weeks post implant. TNF-α levels did not change significantly from 24 hours onwards, however the trend was towards lesser amounts following the initial time point. Histological analysis of the explanted scaffolds showed excellent tissue ingrowth and vascularization. A live/dead stain showed that the cells infiltrating the scaffolds were viable. Both the in vitro and in vivo results of this thesis indicate that D-PHI is a good candidate material for tissue engineering a peripheral artery vascular graft.
Date: 2011
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10393/19768
Supervisor: Lablow, Rosalind S.
Faculty: medicine
Degree: msc

Files in this item

Files Size Format View
McDonald_Sarah_2011_thesis.pdf 8.752Mb application/pdf View/Open

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show full item record


Contact information

Morisset Hall (map)
65 University Private
Ottawa ON Canada
K1N 6N5

Tel. 613-562-5800 (4563)
Fax 613-562-5195

ruor@uottawa.ca