The Role of the Defective Nav1.4 Channels in the Mechanism of Hyperkalemic Periodic Paralysis

The Role of the Defective Nav1.4 Channels in the Mechanism of Hyperkalemic Periodic Paralysis

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Title: The Role of the Defective Nav1.4 Channels in the Mechanism of Hyperkalemic Periodic Paralysis
Author: Lucas, Brooke
Abstract: Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis (HyperKPP) is an autosomal dominant human skeletal muscle channelopathy that causes periods of myotonic discharge and periodic paralysis due to defective Nav1.4 sodium channels. Patients are asymptomatic at birth, attacks become short and frequent during childhood, and more severe during adolescence. Since the Nav1.4 content in the cell membrane is relatively constant during childhood, it was hypothesized that some symptoms start with the defective Nav1.4 channels, while other symptoms start after some changes occur in gene expression affecting other membrane channel content and/or activity. To test the hypothesis, the contractile characteristics of EDL and soleus muscles from HyperKPP mice from the age of 0.5 to 12 months were tested in vitro. For both EDL and soleus, contractile defects, including low force generation, instability and large unstimulated force were observed by two weeks of age. With aging, the defects did not worsen, but muscles actually showed some improvement. Considering that Nav1.4 protein content reaches maximum at three weeks of age, the data suggests that HyperKPP symptoms are solely due to the defective Nav1.4 channels.
Date: 2012
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10393/20550
Supervisor: Renaud, Jean-Marc
Faculty: Médecine / Medicine
Degree: MSc

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