Explaining male inmate victimization in Canadian federal penitentiaries: A test of importation and deprivation theories.

Explaining male inmate victimization in Canadian federal penitentiaries: A test of importation and deprivation theories.

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Titre: Explaining male inmate victimization in Canadian federal penitentiaries: A test of importation and deprivation theories.
Auteur: Swait, Michael.
Résumé: Our understanding of criminal victimization in Canadian penitentiaries is quite limited because little research has been conducted in relation to this phenomenon. As a result, it is quite difficult to determine with any degree of certainty the true extent of inmate victimization in Canada. This paper examines the occurrence of victimization in Canadian penitentiaries to shed light on this phenomenon. Using information derived from the 1995 National Inmate Survey (N = 4,381 male federal inmates), the thesis examines the prevalence of inmate victimization in our federal penitentiaries and its relationship to a variety of institutional and individual indicators, as well as testing the relative usefulness of the importation and deprivation theories in explaining the patterns observed. Instances of physical assaults, assaults with weapons, sexual assaults, staff assaults, and gang activity show that violent behaviors are a fairly common occurrence in federal correctional institutions. Bivariate and multivariate analyses revealed some support for the existence of a relationship between institutional and individual indicators with inmate victimization in Canadian federal penitentiaries. Theoretical and policy implications of the data are suggested.
Date: 2002
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10393/6080

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